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We are not afraid of discussing mistakes to improve our English.

Monotonic/monotone vs. monotonous

At a physics conference I attended last week in Berlin, I came across yet another example of tricky distinctions to master. Several speakers confused the words monotonic or monotone with monotonous. While these words can be used interchangeably in some situations, only monotonic and monotone are correct in a mathematical context. The Oxford online dictionary

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English for gourmets

Fine dining has become a hobby for many people, so it makes sense to acquire the necessary vocabulary. Because the English-speaking countries were for a long time not exactly known for their exquisite food, many of the expressions are in fact of French origin. An amuse-bouche or amuse-gueule (listen here) (known as Gruß aus der

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Expressions worth speaking about: spoken for and bespoke

Today I’m writing about two interesting expressions derived from the verb to speak that you may not have encountered before. First, the adjective spoken for means already claimed or being kept for somebody according to the OLD. In particular, spoken for is an old-fashioned synonym for married. Fortunately, the times when married women were literally

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